To pin or not to pin?

Amnesia Razorfish, an agency of many facets and faces, has joined the Pinterest train. Why may you ask? Well because it’s the big man on campus, socially media speaking.

Plus we get to pin cool stuff like this:

Freddy Mercury riding Darth Vader.

According to Google Ad Planner, Pinterest drew 38 million unique visitors globally in March, which is up from 23.7 million in February and 3.5 million in September last year.

The Los Angeles Times reported how Pinterest is ranked the third-most-popular social networking site behind Facebook and Twitter and the trend is set to rise.

There are articles dedicated to fighting or nurturing Pinterest addictions and Repinly is a page created for the sole purpose of monitoring the most trending Pinterest topics (Food & Drink for now).

So it seems that every marketer, trend observer and media analyst wants a piece of the Pinterest pie, with twitter streams full of answers to the power in a pin.

However for brands, Pinterest is not always the miracle solution for reaching target audiences and, particularly in Australia, the site is yet to prove itself to cautious digital strategists.

For now, these Australian based statistics, found using Google DoubleClick Ad planner, show that while Pinterest is a creative and connected platform, it may not be suited to everybody.

March Pinterest demographics

Pinterest in Australia attracts an older audience, with 34% of users in the 45-54 age bracket.

Of these users, an overwhelming majority (62%) attended ‘some college’ and based on the ‘Audience Interests’ below, the types of colleges become clear.

The most interesting statistic shows that where globally women comprise 72% of pinners, in Australia men are leading the game taking their 52% cut of people pinning.

So what does this mean? Are Australian men less averse to the pictures of cupcakes, Martha Stewart-esque home renovations and wedding dresses dominating Pinterest?

This ostentatious display of everything girly is responsible for the Pinterest inspired site, Gentlemint, that with its mustache logo and promise to be a ‘mint of manly things’ abhors anything with glitter or kittens.

Just like Pinterest, Gentlemint is invitation only and once accepted, men can pin images on “one of the more manly websites on the planet”.

So, what’s on Pinterest that Australian men go gaga over?

Kristie

@kristiebeattie

2 Responses to To pin or not to pin?

  1. Some good observations. Pinterest seems like a great tool for putting together moodboards or wishlists, or even to show off your impeccable taste to friends.

    However, while it has a lot of users, I think we still don’t really understand its role in influencing others’ purchase habits, which is really the key opportunity for brands. What volume of traffic is it actually driving to retailer or brand websites, and crucially how well is this converting into sales?

    When we get a better handle on this I think we’ll start to be able to figure out how it fits into the mix.

  2. […] its users are in fact WOMEN (because we just love to organise and clean)! Interestingly though, in Australia, 52% of its users are men and 48% […]

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