Another step closer to the HoloDeck

January 9, 2012

We have seen some cool stuff in the past that could bring us closer to the Star Trek HoloDeck, e.g. the HoloDesk

And now Microsoft Research has pushed a little further and gives us a 3D hologram that is floating in mid air at 15 frames per second and is viewable from 192 different points at a time.

reminds me of Star Wars

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Of course Kinect is involved here and the depth sensor makes it possible to interact with the hologram – you can basically touch it.

It is still a long way off from 3D hologram telephony or a full size HoloDeck, but for now this is pretty cool.

check out the video:

@maniac13


Proper 3D without glasses just got a bit closer

April 9, 2011

3D is cool, but I do not want to put on glasses every time I watch something in 3D.

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There are plenty of glasses free TVs out there, but let’s face it I do not want to be confined to 3-5 spots in my living room and if I move a little bit the picture will look sh*t.

However, Japanese researchers have devised a new type of hologram technology. They work with normal light and can produce full-coloured 3D images.

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This new technology works by hitting a thin metal film with three beams of white light, each from a different angle. Each beam excites a different colour of light, which then passes through an RGB hologram, combining to form a full-colour 3D image.

These holograms wouldn’t require glasses or viewing angles and how awesome would it be to have real life holograms acting out movies in your living room.

I can’t wait for it.

@maniac13


Amazing holographic drumkit and turntables

February 25, 2010

Neurosonics live. Ammmmaaazzzzing.


Touch my holograms

August 7, 2009

Reading engadget tonight and came across this pretty cool project from the University of Tokyo.

The project, called Touchable Holography, involves the use of Wiimotes placed above the display to track hand motion, and an airborne ultrasound tactile display created in the university’s lab to create the sensation of touch. The result is a holographic image that produces tactile feedback without any actual touching, and without degrading the image itself.

But don’t take my word for it – check it out here

this is sooo cool


NICT researchers develop new method to make holography

November 26, 2008

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Researchers at Japan’s National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (or NICT) have gone some ways towards making holography a tiny bit more practical. As Tech-On reports, their method is based around a fly-eye lens that consists of a number of micro lenses, which allows for moving images to be captured in normal lighting conditions, and is also used to display the image after a computer works its magic on the raw images. There are still a few fairly significant drawbacks to the setup, however, as the image displayed is currently limited to one centimeter in size with a two degree viewing angle, although the researchers say they should be able to increase that to a four centimeters within the next three years.

Still a bit off but closer to my holographic companion than ever.


Touching the hologram

August 5, 2008

Obscura Digital have recently demoed a pretty extraordinary piece of technology – using their reportedly proprietary multi-touch tech and Musion’s Eyeliner 3D “holographic projection system” (quote unquote), the following demonstration comes to life.

Legions of fanboys will soon be able to finally touch Princess Leia.