Wired iPad app sales to surpass print sales this month

June 10, 2010

Wired Magazine have reason to be extra excited about the release of the iPad this month. The iPad edition of Wired, which retails on the app store for $US4.99 has – as of June 7 – been purchased nearly 80,000 – the average monthly sales for the print edition. This is after just two weeks on the app store. This was tweeted by Editor-in-Chief Chris Anderson on Sunday:

73,000 purchases of Wired iPad app in first nine days. Should beat newsstand sales of print mag (ave. mid 80s) this month.

He celebrated again during Steve Jobs’s keynote at WWDC10 on Monday with:

Can die happy now. Steve Jobs shows the Wired iPad app on stage at WWDC! http://twitpic.com/1utfrk

Obviously, with the iPad still being so new and shiny, app sales are likely to be much higher for the next few months, but even so, things look promising for the Wired app. In addition to getting all the articles (and ads) of the print version, there are extra animations, videos and sound clips sprinkled in there.

Personally, I think the Wired iPad app is amazing. After seeing the Wired app, the whole iPad thing made a LOT more sense. The iPad (to me) is a reading device. Reading blogs, articles, ebooks, magazines. It’s just so much easier than sitting at a desk or having the MacBook burn my lap on the couch. I’ll be happily throwing $6 a month into Condé Nast‘s pockets. Much better than the $13 is costs on newsstands in Australia.

Hopefully we’ll be seeing more creative use of the iPad from other magazine publishers.


Chris Anderson’s new book, ‘Free’, rife* with…plagiarism

June 24, 2009

chris anderson free plagiarismApparently, Chris Anderson thinks everything should be free. Footnotes citing large portions of quotes were culled from the Wired editor’s new book, Free, and even though attribution for other sources were included throughout the book, those from Wikipedia were not.

Obviously, Anderson is maintaining his plagiarism was completely unintentional and has issued an apology alongside his publisher, and has promised to amend this situation (albeit online). It’s a little bit unfortunate, given the topic he’s ultimately discussing in this book.