Sex Sells! This works even for bottled water

December 1, 2011

or in the case of the French bottled water company Contrex a fun ad campaign using a Neon Male Stripper.

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This ad was broadcasted in October and it features pink exercise bikes in front of a, what seems to be, historic building in Paris and when some curious ladies start pedalling Neon lights come to life and reveal a male stripper starting to undress.

At the end the girls are told that they just burnt 2000 calories which falls in line with Contrex “My Contrexperience” digital campaign which says that we all would lose more weight if the process was funnier and these ladies definitely look like they had a good time.

Interestingly there are a few rumours online that claim that this is fake as nobody recognizes the building and citizens of Paris claim they never heard of it.

I think it is still a great campaign – tell me what you think in the comments.

@maniac13


Animating a P&O Wave (or How to use Peanut Oil in a Website).

November 30, 2009

Last week we launched the new P&O Website [cue the trumpets because it took a year!] Whilst e-commerce websites aren’t generally considered somewhere you can ‘get creative’ we decided this should be an interesting challenge …which it was. When we did our early research we found some very interesting insight about that “twilight zone” where air meets water (see images below). We realised there was something here to play with and decided that if we could execute it well enough it could be an important design feature on the site… but execute it poorly and it would just look tacky. (Let us know what you think).

Above Video: The making of the wave: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWCsS7W3yQk

Creating a ‘wave’ was not as simple as we first thought. Animated tests trying to simulate the wave in 3D or in Flash just didn’t cut it. We wanted something which felt as realistic as possible. We next moved to the real world but equally found that water on its own did not work well at all when we filmed it. To cut a very long story short we finally made a glass tank (very lo-tech – a vase with half a CD case fixed using a glue gun) and filled it with 50% water (tinted blue with food dye) and 50% clear peanut oil. The two substances allowed us to create and film the illusion of water moving very realistically but a much slower down rate. Some After Effects magic with the raw film and we now have a looped, low bandwidth wave for the P&O site.

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Final Website above: http://www.pocruises.com.au/Pages/default.aspx

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Above: During design research we found a ton of wonderful images which were part of the inspiration for the final wave.

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Above: Other features in the site include “Full Screen Experiences” that work without leaving the current page you are on. It’s slightly buried but an unusual feature – especially for an ecom website.

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 ~@eunmac


Saving the worlds from the energy crisis

December 7, 2008

Slow-moving ocean and river currents could be a new, reliable and affordable alternative energy source. A University of Michigan engineer has made a machine that works like a fish to turn potentially destructive vibrations in fluid flows into clean, renewable power.

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This device could harness energy from most of the water currents around the globe because it works in flows moving slower than 2 knots (about 2 miles per hour.) Most of the Earth’s currents are slower than 3 knots. Turbines and water mills need an average of 5 or 6 knots to operate efficiently.

Vortex induced vibrations are undulations that a rounded or cylinder-shaped object makes in a flow of fluid, which can be air or water. The presence of the object puts kinks in the current’s speed as it skims by.

The engineer says VIVACE energy would cost about 5.5 cents per kilowatt hour. Wind energy costs 6.9 cents a kilowatt hour. Nuclear costs 4.6, and solar power costs between 16 and 48 cents per kilowatt hour depending on the location.

So this might mean that we can battle the energy crisis and save money – I don’t know about you, but I like it.

read the full article here