MetaMirror & The Future of TV

September 7, 2010

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MetaMirror is a concept, a culmination of our involvement in the Digital Home space, designed in response to new television watching behaviors.

Meta-Mirror is a concept application that delivers an enhanced television experience without disrupting the conventional expectations of home entertainment. It allows viewers to access content relevant to the program currently being viewed.

Metamirror & The Future of TV Article

 

@danKrause


It’s a map… of the future.

November 4, 2009

Created by DensityDesign, this impressive piece of info-cartography takes a while to digest but is worth a look if you’re into this sort of thing.

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Wonder if this belongs on Strange Maps? 🙂

Also makes me think of the iA Web Trends Map:

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@iclazie


Visualising Australian Web Traffic

August 11, 2009

A great visualisation tool highlighting the top ranking Australian website statistics (here) built for Neilsen and AIMIA by the interaction consortium. It’s not only a much more usable interface for getting a grip on trends and traffic, but it also gives some interesting insight into how quickly the digital landscape shifts and how those of us in the industry must continue to adapt and innovate. Pretty (and functional) work. 

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http://avant.interactionconsortium.com/australian_internet/#

Posted By @eunmac


Razorfish TweetDoubler – Amazing Twitter tool that allows twice the character count

April 1, 2009

We’re pretty excited here in Australia to be the first people globally to talk about a new text compression technology just released by Razorfish, one of the worlds largest digital agencies. The Razorfish guys in white coats have developed a compression algorithm that works on text, a bit like the way jpeg compresses an image – which means HUGE news for everyone using Twitter.

Try it now! www.tweetdoubler.com

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Twitter normally only allows 140 characters. This Razorfish web application allows you type DOUBLE the normal amount.

You simply enter the text (up to 280 characters) – the compression takes about half a second, next your compressed tweet is sent out (under 140 chars) and then automatically decompressed as the end user views the message. It’s so simple, it’s hard to believe nobody has done this before.

We believe that in the future we can optimise the algorithm, potentially allowing 1000 characters to be compressed to inside Twitter’s limits of 140 characters. This first round of beta testing will provide us with enough data to push limits in the future.

Razorfish Credits:
Thanks to the globally coordinated team who have worked around the clock to bring this to life. Make sure you say Hi to them on Twitter:

Olaf Prilo (@olafprilo) – Independent Science and Maths Consultant.
Iain McDonald (@eunmac) – Creative Director.
Stephan Lange (@Maniac13) – Project Co-ordination.
Chris Saunders (@thesaund) – Lead Coder.
Michael Kliennman – Lead Design.
Shiv Singh – (@shivsingh) Social Media Director.
David Deal (@davidjdeal) – Marketing Director.

Please note this is a beta version open for testing for today only. Enjoy & have a wonderful day 😉


Customising the Twitter Web Interface

February 9, 2009

I don’t use the Twitter web interface too much. Tweetdeck is so far ahead in terms of usability and functionality. However… This weekend I was pretty surprised when I saw a tweet from @MichDdot (here) who had a totally different web interface to mine. I was thinking he must have some inside beta version, but it turned out that what he had was available to all of us…

Anyway, he was kind enough to let me know what he’d done, so I thought I’d share with you how I have managed to make my Twitter web interface much more usable (screenshots below):

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Above: Notice changes in interface screenshot (from top to bottom)
– Grader information
– Twitter Search and People Search
– Retweet
– Nested conversations
– Embedded replies
– (I’ve done a heap more on the homepage too)

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Above: On the homepage (twiiter/hone) I’ve added:
– Ability to autotype follower names when typing @ or D
– Search
– Following names
– Nested conversations

How is this done?

1. Install GreaseMonkey plugin for FireFox (here)
2. Add custom GreaseMonkey scripts (here) from USerscripts.org

There are dozens of scripts available for customising Twitter, the above are just the ones I chose but there are many more.

Simple! Thanks again to MichDdot for the headsup – a recommended follow!

Any Q’s – ping me on Twitter –  Regards, @eunmac


iGoogle attacked by giant widgets

October 17, 2008

Google’s personalized home page, iGoogle, is getting an update this Friday. Widgets on the page can support a new “canvas view,” which expands the widget to the full iGoogle window.

The new iGoogle also moves user navigation from tabs at the top of the page to a bar down the left side. This enables more pages and elements in the navigation, and I found that it made navigating iGoogle faster, since it provided a de facto table of contents for each page.

Like many of Google’s services, iGoogle is platform-aware. On a mobile phone, like on an iPhone or Android phone, when you log in to iGoogle, you’ll get a view of your page suited to the constraints of the device.

Blogged with the Flock Browser

3D web game for Axe (Lynx) Dark Temptation campaign in Brazil

April 11, 2008

http://www.axe.com.br/dark

This is a great looking game. Somewhat reminicent of GTA-style gameplay (except you control a chocolate man rather than a hardened criminal, and you’re being chased by girls instead of thugs with uzis…) Unfortunately its potential is crippled by the immense file size (just shy of 10MB – all loaded upfront). Nevertheless, the graphics, animation and gameplay are all very well executed and the integration between Flash and Unity is seamless. It’s definitely worth checking out if you don’t mind waiting for a long time. Also requires the Unity Player plugin (get it here if you don’t have it already).

FYI – Being a Brazilian site, the game is in Portuguese. “Jogar Agora” means “Play Now”. The gameplay isn’t too hard to figure out, even if you can’t read the instructions.